Saturday, October 23, 2010

More fun with kimchi - Kimchi jigae (kimchi soup)

Here's another kimchi recipe, not made up this time, but mostly veganized from Marc's over at No Recipes.  Other than substituting for the pork belly, I made very few changes because I was curious to try his suggestions of adding miso and Earth Balance (in his version, butter).  On the whole, from me miso gets a thumbs up and the Earth Balance got a thumbs down, possibly because Earth Balance is so salty and the one thing this dish didn't need was any more salt.  Nice meal though, and quite pretty to boot.  Except I'm getting a complex about not composing my photos better and I have to set up some sort of lighting arrangement so I can take pictures elsewhere than only on the surface of the stove...

Kimchi Jigae
Serves 4

1 tbsp vegetable oil
1 cup shredded seitan, or reconstituted Soy Curls or yuba or TVP
1/2 small onion sliced
1 1/2 cup loosely packed kimchi
4 cloves of garlic, minced
1/2 cup kimchi juice
2 cup water
1 tsp grated ginger
1 tbsp cooking wine (such as mirin or shaoxing)
2 tsp gochujang (Korean chili paste)
2 tsp miso
2 tsp soy sauce
2 tbsp gochugaru (Korean dried chili flakes; optional)
8 oz silken tofu sliced into cubes
enoki mushrooms
2 green onions thinly sliced
1 tbsp Earth Balance

Heat a medium saucepan to medium heat. When hot, add the oil, and when the oil is hot, add the seitan etc., and the onion. Fry for a few minutes, until the onion is translucent, then add the kimchi juice, water, ginger, cooking wine, gochujang, miso and soy sauce, stirring everything together to combine.

I used gluten balls for my protein but next time will try yuba
Bring to a boil and taste for spiciness; adjust if necessary. Add the tofu and enoks, turn down the heat to a simmer, and let the soup cook for 15-20 minutes, or until the kimchi is tender and the ingredients are well incorporated.



When you’re ready to serve, add the green onions and Earth Balance. Serve with rice or noodles.

7 comments:

  1. Every time I see a bowl of stew like this I want it. I think the composition IN the bowl is more important than outside the bowl, in a case like this. Your meals are always beautifully composed, in my humble opinion, so don't go stressing about it. I was just at a giant Asian market looking for fresh yuba but was unable to find it. Darn. Have you ever tried making it with fresh soymilk that you've made?

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  2. I agree with Andrea: you are the queen of making delicious looking bowls of stew/soups etc! Though all your food is gorgeous!

    Those chunks of tofu look so enticing to me. And, I love the gluten balls...I made them for the first time after reading about them here. And, like Andrea, I also have a difficult time finding fresh yuba...I know you've made them from scratch before, but I always think, "I would screw that up" whenever I read about how it's done.

    This time of year is getting difficult for photos around here too! I was taking them on my sun porch or in the garden over the summer and the light was perfect...now, as it's getting dark earlier, I can't get enough light no matter where I take a shot.

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  3. Andrea and Rose, thanks for your kind words. I will get the lighting situation sorted out though, I hope. My house is way too dark anyway, and now that it's pretty much pitch dark by 6:00 some extra lighting would probably be good for me.

    I did make yuba from scratch once, and wrote about it here: http://airyway.blogspot.com/2009/09/making-yuba-from-scratch.html

    But it is a hassle, and besides, fresh yuba, delicious as it is, wouldn't hold up in a stew like this. Buy the sticks and rehydrate them in warm water for half an hour and you'll be good to go.

    Rose, I dream about those tofu chunks...they're usually the inspiration for my Asian stews and hotpots. Fresh tofu is so good!

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  4. This looks absolutely amazing! That last photo has beautiful composition.

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  5. I really want a bowl of this mouthwatering soup. Will you make it for me someday?
    Please, pretty please! I think your photo's and composition are always beautiful!

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  6. Looks delicious, although the addition of butter does sound wierd. I've never heard of that in a non-creamy soup!

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  7. Tami, thanks. Katee, you will be getting a jar of my new & improved kimchi without a doubt--and I will make the soup for you anytime.

    VegSpinz, yeah, the butter thing was so weird I had to try it. Oh, well.

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